Tuesday, February 09, 2016

The Beauty of the Trees Speaks to Me

"This is the realm of true reality where you forget what is on your mind and stop looking.  In a wild field, not choosing, picking up whatever comes to hand, the obvious meaning of Zen is clear in the hundred grasses.  Indeed, the green bamboo, the clusters of yellow flowers, fences, walls, tiles, and pebble us the teaching of the inanimate; rivers, birds, trees, and groves expound suffering, emptiness, and selflessness.  This is based on the one true reality, producing unconditional compassion, manifesting uncontrived, supremely wondrous power in the great jewel light of nirvana.

An ancient master said, "Meeting a companion on the Way, spending a life together, the whole task of study is done."  Another master said, "If I pick up a single leaf and go into the city, I move the whole of the mountain."  That is why one ancient adept was enlightened on hearing the sound of pebbles striking bamboo, while another was awakened on seeing peach trees in bloom.  An ancient worthy, working in the fields in his youth , was breaking up clumps of earth when he saw a big clod, which he playfully smashed with a fierce blow; as it shattered, he was suddenly greatly enlightened.  One Zen master attained enlightenment on seeing the flagpole of a teaching center from the other side of a river.  Another spoke of the staff of the spirit.  One adept illustrated Zen realization by planting a hoe in the ground; another master spoke of Zen in term of sowing the fields.  All of these instances were bringing out this indestructible true being, allowing people to visit a greatly liberated true teacher without moving a step.

Carrying out the unspoken teaching, attaining unhindered eloquence, thus they forever studied all over from all things, embracing the all-inclusive universe, detaching from both abstract and concrete definitions of buddhahood, and transcendentally realizing universal, all pervasive Zen in the midst of all activities.  Why necessarily consider holy places, teachers' abodes, or religious organizations and forms prerequisite to personal familiarity and attainment of realization?"

-  Yuan-Wu, The House of Lin-Chi, "The Five Houses of Zen," translated by Thomas Cleary, Shambhala Press, 1997, p. 58.  


"I did however used to think, you know, in the woods walking, and as a kid playing the the woods, that there was a kind of immanence there - that woods, a places of that order, had a sense, a kind of presence, that you could feel; that there was something peculiarly, physically present, a feeling of place almost conscious ... like God.  It evoked that."
-  Robert Creely, Robert Creely and the Genius of the American Common Place, p. 40   



"The beauty of the trees,
the softness of the air,
the fragrance of the grass,
speaks to me.
The summit of the mountain,
the thunder of the sky,
speaks to me.
The faintness of the stars,
the trail of the sun,
the strength of fire,
and the life that never goes away,
they speak to me.
And my heart soars."
-  Chief Dan George  



Zen Poetry

Buddhism

Haiku Poetry

Gardening and Spirituality

Trees





Monday, February 08, 2016

The Benefits of Qigong Exercises for Older Persons

The Anti-Aging Benefits of Chinese Qigong (Chi Kung) Exercises
Gentle Exercise, Breathing, and Meditation


Scientific Research  Many Reports on the Effect of Qigong on Improving the Health of the Elderly

Aging Well

"Qigong can do wonders to rejuvenate the elderly. In fact, more than 50 percent of the people who begin tai chi and qigong in China do so after the age of 60, when the realities of aging can no longer be pushed aside. Already, hundreds of millions of people over the age of 60 have found qigong to be uniquely effective."
-  Bruce Frantzis, Qigong for Seniors


Anti-Aging Benefits of Qigong   by Kenneth Sancier, Ph.D.

Qigong for the Elderly


"This report shows that regular qigong practice could relieve depression, improve self-efficacy and personal well being among elderly persons with chronic physical illness and depression"
-  Effect of a Qigong Program on Elderly Persons with Depression, International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.


Qigong (Chi Kung):  Styles,Bibliographies, Research, Resources, Links, Lessons, Benefits, Quotations.  Website by Mike Garofalo.

A review of clinical trials of t’ai chi and qigong in older adults reported in the March 2009 issue of the Western Journal of Nursing Research notes that qigong improves physical functioning, limits fall risk, alleviates symptoms of depression and anxiety, and lowers blood pressure in older adults.

"Why Every Elderly Citizen Should Do Qigong: Qigong can treat many diseases.  Qigong can prevent many diseases.  Qigong can extend life.  Qigong can improve the quality of life.  Qigong can prevent accidents."


"According to T'ai Chi and Qigong enthusiasts, the discipline can prevent many ailments, including high blood pressure, tuberculosis, and diabetes, and US scientists agree that T'ai Chi can offer some important fitness benefits, particularly for older adults."
-  Modern Maturity, V. 35 June/July 92 p. 60-62


Qigong (Chi Kung): Recommended Reading, Bibliography, Resources, Links, Quotations.  Research by Mike Garofalo, Qigong Instructor


"The average person uses only five to ten percent of his or her 15 billion brain cells; yet studies show that Qi Gong activates 90 percent of the human brain by suffusing it with stimulating bioelectric currents.  This results in significant memory improvement, learning, and enhancement of the physiological functions  controlled by the brain.  Studies also show that practicing Qi Gong increases the level of essential neurotransmitters in the blood.  Deficiency of these elements can cause Parkinsons, Alzheimer’s, chronic depression, and insomnia."
-  Lee Holden


According to the February 2009 issue of The Journal of Nursing, “evidence-based research supports the argument that qigong improves cardiovascular-respiratory function and lipid profile, decreases blood sugar, and relieves anxiety and depression.”

An Evidence-Based Review of Qi Gong by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration, 2010

The Healing Promise of Qi: Creating Extraordinary Wellness Through Qigong and Tai Chi.  By Roger Jahnke, O.M.D..  Chicago, Contemporary Books, 2002.   Index, notes, extensive recommended reading list, 316 pages.  ISBN: 0809295288.  VSCL.  

The Way of Qigong: The Art and Science of Chinese Energy Healing.  By Kenneth S. Cohen.  Foreword by Larry Dossey.  New York Ballantine Books, 1997.  Index, notes, appendices, 427 pages.  ISBN: 0345421094.  One of my favorite books: comprehensive, informative, practical, and scientific.  VSCL.  




Sunday, February 07, 2016

Walking: The First Meditation



"Walking is the great adventure, the first meditation,
a practice of heartiness and soul primary to humankind.
Walking is the exact balance between spirit and humility."
- Gary Snyder, The Practice of the Wild

"My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing."
- Aldous Huxley

Saturday, February 06, 2016

Optimal Aging


Twenty Rules for Optimal Living in the 21st Century

1.  Face Reality
2.  Take Action
3.  Create Yourself
4.  Accept Responsibility
5.  Do It Now
6.  You Can't Change the Past
7.  Act Like a Scientist
8.  Work, Work, Work and Practice, Practice, Practice
9.  Push Yourself
10.  Do and Feel
11.  There's No Gain Without Pain
12.  Accept and Forgive Yourself Unconditionally
13.  Live for Now and for the Future
14.  Commit Yourself
15.  Take Risks
16.  Be Interested in Yourself and in Others 
17.  Remain Flexible 
18.  Use It Or Lose It
19.  Accept Uncertainty
20.  Don't Expect Heaven on Earth 

Albert Ellis, Ph.D., and Emmett Verlten, Ph.D.  Optimal Aging: Get Over Getting Older  1998

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Aging Well: Quotes, Notes, Bibliography


Friday, February 05, 2016

Day Hiking in Oregon


Day Hiking in California, Oregon and Washington
A hypertext notebook by Mike Garofalo.

Our next camping and day hiking trip in March will be to Nehalem Bay State Park in Oregon. We are staying in a yurt at the park. I plan to take long walks on the beaches, and hike up Neahkahnie Mountain.

My favorite travel guides to the Oregon coast are:

Day Hiking the Oregon Coast: Beaches, Headlands, Coastal Trail. By Bonnie Henderson. Seattle, Washington, Mountaineers Books, 2nd Edition, 2015. Index, 285 pages. ISBN: 9781594859090. VSCL.

Coastal Oregon. By W. C. McRae and Judy Jewell. A Moon Handbook. Avalon Travel Pub., 6th Edition, 2016. Index, appendices, 260 pages. ISBN: 1631212524. I use the 3rd Edition. VSCL. 


The photograph below was taken from the top of Neahkahnie Mountain, looking south. In the middle left is Nehalem Bay. We have gone crabbing in Nehalem Bay.   

Friday, January 01, 2016

Plans for 2016


Reassess the value and benefits, for others and for myself, of my blogging, and my webpage development and maintenance projects.  

Accomplish many home improvements, refurbishments, painting, and clean up projects.

Complete my normal daily exercise and fitness routines.

Work diligently to reduce my A1C blood sugar test results to under 6.5, and my body weight down to 240 pounds.  Effectively manage my eating of nutritious foods, carefully use my diabetic medicines, exercise, reduce stress, and get adequate rest to slow the deterioration progress of my Type 2 Diabetes.

Complete 9 months of my last 18 months of part-time elementary school district work before my retirement in December of 2017.

Do what I can to help make for a peaceful, productive, prosperous, beneficial, and healthy community.

Discontinue activities that are not supportive and aligned with my preferences and goals.

Weed my used book collection.

Enjoy more frequent camping and day hiking adventures in coastal Oregon and California.  



The Cloud Hands Blog has been in existence since 2005.  I have posted 2,193 times to this blog.  There have been 635,000 Page Views of this blog.  Many positive reviews and some awards have been given to this blog.  The right hand column of this blog provides extensive subject access to my hundreds of webpages and blog postings.  There is plenty of content still available on this blog and my webpages that readers might find useful.  Enjoy! 



If you don't set objectives, goals, intentions, resolutions, or aims, then it is far less likely that you will accomplish any of those objectives.  With no target to shoot at, how do you aim?  Use your energy, your thinking, and your will to prioritize, focus, and accomplish the most important objectives.


Simplicity Quotations

Simple Living Manifesto: 72 Ideas to Simplify Your Life

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons







Saturday, December 26, 2015

December 2015

We enjoyed visiting with family and friends in California, Oregon, and Washington all during this past month of December.

Karen and I just returned today to Red Bluff after being in Oregon for 8 days.  Back to our normal home and work routines.

We are both in good health and wish the same for others.

Happy Holidays to All.  









 

Sunday, December 06, 2015

A Carpet of Leaves



 Frost and Tomatoes Don't Go Well Together:




Two large Raywood Ash trees in our back yard can lay down many leaves on a windy day in December





Saturday, December 05, 2015

Long Fence Line



Looking north from our home, at the circled end of the Kilkenny Lane cul-de-sac.  The smell of eucalyptus trees is potent and unique.  There are many eucalyptus trees on my property.  The fence line separates Debbie's property to the left (west) of the fence, and Ruth's property to the right (east) of the fence; and Slade's property is to the north of Debbie and Ruth's property.  Everything is fenced.  Cattle are raised on Slade's property. 


 


Friday, December 04, 2015

Daodejing, Laozi: Indexes, Selected Translations, Resources, Bibliography

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu circa 200 BCE

Indexes Selected Translations, Bibliography, Comments, Resources.  Compiled by Mike Garofalo. 
Version 2.1, October 2015


A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes over 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.   


Chapter 1, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey   



 

Thursday, December 03, 2015

Dark and Dreary Day

Sipping coffee and thinking.
I look forward to walking with my dog this morning.
John will be working on our new back door and back entrance siding.  
Mick and April arrive here this afternoon. 
Outside: 45F, overcast, drizzling, sprinking, raining, a darker world.

We have been very busy lately with traveling and having visitors.  We were in Portland for a week before Thanksgiving Day.

November was a very busy month for Karen and I.  

We have repaired the entire south side of our house and the entire back porch.  Both have been painted.

Busy with part-time employment 3 days 8 hours per week, and hope to retire from this job in 12/18.  I still teach yoga/qigong 3 hours each week.

Pulled up dying summer vegetables, raked, spread manure.  Enjoyed working outdoors when it was sprinkling.  When it really started to rain I retreated to a shed or indoors.

"From December to March, there are for many of us three gardens -
the garden outdoors,
the garden of pots and bowls in the house,
and the garden of the mind's eye."
-   Katherine S. White












Last View of Their Swing
11/26/2015, Portland
By Mike Garofalo






















 















Cold nights and wind have killed all the summer vegetables. 
2015 gone for them and us.

Quotations and Poems Representing the Month of December


Wednesday, December 02, 2015

Stoic Philosophy: Notes and Reflections


Stoicism: Bibliography, Hypertext Notebook, Resources, Research, Themes, Reflections

Research by Mike Garofalo.  250KB, November, 2015

In the last month, I have been steadily reading Hellenistic philosophers (300 BCE - 200 CE).  I've read all of Marcus Arelius and Epictetus.  I'm now reading Seneca and Cicero.  I've read many commentaries and scholarly works about the Stoics and Greco-Roman Hellenistic Ethical viewpoints.  

I've focused recently on using Stoic practices, maxims, exercises, and skills development for improving my daily life. 

Saturday, November 28, 2015

Chi Kung and Aging

The Anti-Aging Benefits of Chinese Qigong (Chi Kung) Exercises
Gentle Exercise, Breathing, and Meditation


Scientific Research  Many Reports on the Effect of Qigong on Improving the Health of the Elderly

"Qigong can do wonders to rejuvenate the elderly. In fact, more than 50 percent of the people who begin tai chi and qigong in China do so after the age of 60, when the realities of aging can no longer be pushed aside. Already, hundreds of millions of people over the age of 60 have found qigong to be uniquely effective."
-  Bruce Frantzis, Qigong for Seniors


Anti-Aging Benefits of Qigong   by Kenneth Sancier, Ph.D.

Qigong for the Elderly


"This report shows that regular qigong practice could relieve depression, improve self-efficacy and personal well being among elderly persons with chronic physical illness and depression"
Effect of a Qigong Program on Elderly Persons with Depression, International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.


Qigong (Chi Kung):  Styles,Bibliographies, Research, Resources, Links, Lessons, Benefits, Quotations.  Website by Mike Garofalo.

A review of clinical trials of t’ai chi and qigong in older adults reported in the March 2009 issue of the Western Journal of Nursing Research notes that qigong improves physical functioning, limits fall risk, alleviates symptoms of depression and anxiety, and lowers blood pressure in older adults.

"Why Every Elderly Citizen Should Do Qigong: Qigong can treat many diseases.  Qigong can prevent many diseases.  Qigong can extend life.  Qigong can improve the quality of life.  Qigong can prevent accidents."


"According to T'ai Chi and Qigong enthusiasts, the discipline can prevent many ailments, including high blood pressure, tuberculosis, and diabetes, and US scientists agree that T'ai Chi can offer some important fitness benefits, particularly for older adults." 
Modern Maturity, V. 35 June/July 92 p. 60-62


Qigong (Chi Kung): Recommended Reading, Bibliography, Resources, Links, Quotations.  Research by Mike Garofalo, Qigong Instructor


"The average person uses only five to ten percent of his or her 15 billion brain cells; yet studies show that Qi Gong activates 90 percent of the human brain by suffusing it with stimulating bioelectric currents.  This results in significant memory improvement, learning, and enhancement of the physiological functions controlled by the brain.  Studies also show that practicing Qi Gong increases the level of essential neurotransmitters in the blood.  Deficiency of these elements can cause Parkinsons, Alzheimer’s, chronic depression, and insomnia."
Lee Holden


According to the February 2009 issue of The Journal of Nursing, “evidence-based research supports the argument that qigong improves cardiovascular-respiratory function and lipid profile, decreases blood sugar, and relieves anxiety and depression.”

An Evidence-Based Review of Qi Gong by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration, 2010

The Healing Promise of Qi: Creating Extraordinary Wellness Through Qigong and Tai Chi.  By Roger Jahnke, O.M.D..  Chicago, Contemporary Books, 2002.   Index, notes, extensive recommended reading list, 316 pages.  ISBN: 0809295288.  VSCL.  
 
The Way of Qigong: The Art and Science of Chinese Energy Healing.  By Kenneth S. Cohen.  Foreword by Larry Dossey.  New York Ballantine Books, 1997.  Index, notes, appendices, 427 pages.  ISBN: 0345421094.  One of my favorite books: comprehensive, informative, practical, and scientific.  VSCL.  





Friday, November 27, 2015

Chapter 69, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Dao De Jing, Laozi
Chapter 69

"The generals have a saying:
"Rather than make the first move
it is better to wait and see.
Rather than advance an inch
it is better to retreat a yard."
This is called
going forward without advancing,
pushing back without using weapons.
There is no greater misfortune
than underestimating your enemy.
Underestimating your enemy
means thinking that he is evil.
Thus you destroy your three treasures
and become an enemy yourself.
When two great forces oppose each other,
the victory will go
to the one that knows how to yield."
-  Translated by Stephen Mitchell, 1988, Chapter 69 



"In conflict just be cautious
And always on your guard
Rather than advance an inch
Instead retreat a yard
In this way you go along
And make your gain without advancing
You deal with the rival
As your position is enhancing
Remember that it's possible
Your rival just may yield
So don't advance on such a foe
Let differences be healed"
-  Translated by Jim Clatfelder, 2000, Chapter 69  


"An ancient tactician has said:
'I dare not act as a host, but would rather act as a guest;
I dare not advance an inch, but would rather retreat a foot.'
This implies that he does not marshal the ranks as if there were no ranks;
He does not roll up his sleeves as if he had no arms;
He does not seize as if he had no weapons;
He does not fight as if there were no enemies.
No calamity is greater than under-estimating the enemy.
To under-estimate the enemy is to be on the point of losing our treasure.
Therefore, when opposing armies meet in the field the truthful will win."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 69 



"From using force a saying emerges: I dare not act like a ruler, but instead I must act like a guest.
Do not venture an inch when you can withdraw a foot.
This is called progress without progressing.

Seize without seizing.
Apply force to no opponent.
Manage without weapons.

There is no greater calamity than disregarding the enemy.
Disregarding your enemy brings you close to the death of what you treasure.

When two armies meet and inspect each other, grieve for the winner!"
-  Translated by Alan Sheets and Barbara Tovey, 2002, Chapter 69  


"A military expert has said:
'I do not dare put myself forward as a host, but always act as a guest. I hesitate to advance an inch, but am willing to withdraw a foot.'
This is advancing by not advancing, it is winning without arms, it is charging without hostility, it is seizing without weapons.
There is no mistake greater than making light of an enemy.
By making light of an enemy we lose our treasure. 
Therefore when well-matched armies come to conflict, the one who is conscious of his weakness conquers."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 69 



用兵有言:
"吾不敢為主而為客.
不敢進寸而退尺."
是謂行無行,
攘無臂扔無敵,
執無兵.
禍莫大於輕敵,
輕敵幾喪吾寶.
故抗兵相加,
哀者勝矣.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 69


yung pin yu yen:
"wu pu kan wei chu erh wei k'o,
pu kan chin ts'un erh t'ui ch'ih."
shih wei hsing wu hsing,
jang wu pi jêng wu ti,
chih wu ping.
huo mo ta yü ch'ing ti,
ch'ing ti chi sang wu pao.
ku k'ang ping hsiang chia,
ai chê shêng yi. 
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 69 



"The handbook of the strategist has said:
'Do not invite the fight, accept it instead,'
'Better a foot behind than an inch too far ahead,'
Which means:
Look a man straight in the face and make no move,
Roll up your sleeve and clench no fist,
Open your hand and show no weapon,
Bare your breast and find no foe.
But as long as there be a foe, value him,
Respect him, measure him, be humble toward him;
Let him not strip from you, however strong he be,
Compassion, the one wealth which can afford him."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 69 



"On military operations we have:
"I do not boldly attack others first,
But take action only after being attacked."
"I do not boldly move forward even an inch,
But withdraw a foot."
This is called the operation of non-operation,
Bearing the arms of non-arms,
Charging the enemy of non-enemy,
Carrying the weapons of non-weapons.
There is no more serious misfortune
Than to engage in war lightly.
To engage in war lightly is to violate my essential teachings of compassion,
renunciation, and never longing to be first in the world.
Therefore, when two armies join in battle,
The one that is compassionate wins."
-  Translated by Chang Chung-Yuan, Chapter 69  



"Existe un dicho entre los soldados:
“No me atrevo a hacer el primer movimiento;
preferiría ser el huésped.
No me atrevo avanzar una pulgada; más bien
preferiría retroceder un pie.”

Esto es avanzar sin aparentar moverse;
capturar el enemigo sin atacar;
estar armado sin armas.

No existe mayor catástrofe que desestimar al enemigo.
por desestimar al enemigo casi pierdo lo que valoro:
por lo mismo, cuando la batalla se libra,
el más débil vencerá."
-  Translated by Cristina Bosch, 2002, Capítulo 69



"From using force a saying emerges: I dare not act like a ruler, but instead I must act like a guest.
Do not venture an inch when you can withdraw a foot.
This is called progress without progressing.

Seize without seizing.
Apply force to no opponent.
Manage without weapons.

There is no greater calamity than disregarding the enemy.
Disregarding your enemy brings you close to the death of what you treasure.

When two armies meet and inspect each other, grieve for the winner!"
-  Translated by Alan Sheets and Barbara Tovey, 2002, Chapter 69  


"A military expert has said:
'I do not dare put myself forward as a host, but always act as a guest. I hesitate to advance an inch, but am willing to withdraw a foot.'
This is advancing by not advancing, it is winning without arms, it is charging without hostility, it is seizing without weapons.
There is no mistake greater than making light of an enemy.
By making light of an enemy we lose our treasure. 
Therefore when well-matched armies come to conflict, the one who is conscious of his weakness conquers."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 69 




A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes over 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.   


Chapter 69, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey   

 




Thursday, November 26, 2015

We Give Thanks


Happy Thanksgiving Day!!


T   hanks for time to be together, turkey, talk, and tangy weather.
for harvest stored away, home, and hearth, and holiday.
for autumn's frosty art, and abundance in the heart.
for neighbors, and November, nice things, new things to remember.
for kitchen, kettles' croon, kith and kin expected soon.
for sizzles, sights, and sounds, and something special that about.
   
That spells THANKS for joy in living and a jolly good Thanksgiving.
                
-   Aileen Fisher, All in a Word



"They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty.  For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercising in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion.  All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees).  And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc.  Besides they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion.  Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.”
-   William Bradford, 1621 


In 1863, Abraham Lincoln, declared the last Thursday of November to be
a National Day of Thanksgiving.